"But there is one way in this country in which all men are created equal-there is one human institution that makes a pauper the equal of a Rockefeller, the stupid man the equal of an Einstein, and the ignorant man the equal of any college president. That institution, gentlemen, is a court. It can be the Supreme Court of the United States or the humblest J.P. court in the land, or this honorable court which you serve. Our courts have their faults, as does any human institution, but in this country our courts are the great levelers, and in our courts all men are created equal."
- Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird 218 (1960)

Welcome

O’Malley & Madden, P.C. is a civil litigation firm concentrating its practice in the areas of employment law and civil rights. The firm is dedicated to ensuring a workplace that is free from discrimination, harassment, and retaliation. We pride ourselves in serving our clients vigorously, ethically, and with passion.

We hope that you will take the time to contact one of our attorneys to find out how we can help you.

ATTORNEYS

M. Megan O’Malley

Megan O’Malley, a principal and founding member of O’Malley & Madden, P.C., concentrates her practice in the areas of civil rights and employment law.



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John P. Madden

John P. Madden is a principal and founding member of O’Malley & Madden, P.C. and focuses his practice primarily in the areas of employment law, civil and commercial litigation, and appellate law.



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Katherine Ellis

Katherine Ellis is an associate attorney at O’Malley & Madden, P.C. She concentrates her practice in the areas of labor and employment law.



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PRACTICE AREAS

O'Malley & Madden Weekly

TOPIC OF THE WEEK

Gender Identity Discrimination

Gender identity discrimination in the workplace occurs when an employer discriminates against an...

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BLOG OF THE WEEK

THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK

What the LGBT community want is [for being LGBT] to be ordinary so that you are seen to be valued on merit. When our employees don’t have to think twice about struggling for the same benefits, recognition, or are afraid of being safe, then productivity goes up.

–Claudia Brind-Woody, VP & Managing Director, IBM

LIST OF THE WEEK

from The National LGBT Workers Center

BARRIERS FOR LGBT EMPLOYEES

A recent study suggests that nearly 50% of LGBT workers remain closeted at work and fear being stereotyped or jeopardizing professional connections. Anti-LGBT bias is highly prevalent in the workplace and creates massive hurdles in the day-to-day:

Hiring/Firing
  • 27% of transgender workers reported being fired, not hired, or denied promotion in 2016-2017.
Wages Despite comprising
  • 4.5% of adults in the United States, LGBT adults comprise 6.2% of people who earn less than $36,000 a year.
  • 1 22% of LGBT workers were not paid or promoted at the same rate as colleagues.
  • Gay men report higher salaries than lesbian women, but both report less income than non-LGBT colleagues. 
Benefits
  • Only 1 out of 5 U.S. companies offer paid family leave for LGBT employees.
  • Only 58% of Fortune 500 companies offer transgender-inclusive benefits.